Toddler Room - 18 to 30 months

Toddler Room

In our toddler room, our teachers have a strong understanding of the growing toddler. Each day is spent fostering the growth of the individual child as they learn and grow together. Because toddlers are learning at such a fast past, the teachers keep their day moving by planning plenty of activities in all developmental areas and make them exciting, fun, and hands on. Our teachers also know and understand that a toddlers needs may change quickly and are ready to adapt and make changes in the classroom to accommodate the needs of the children. Our toddler classroom is equipped with developmentally appropriate materials and equipment to enable the children to learn and grow.

Although most of our activities and interactions with the toddlers take place in their classroom, we also give them the opportunity to explore and move in bigger ways in our large muscle room where climbing, crawling, jumping, walking, riding, and throwing balls and much more are encouraged. The playground which is enclosed and designed for toddlers provides a safe and exciting outdoor experience for the children. In addition we take the children for walks throughout the building and outside when appropriate to explore and learn about the world around them.

Communication

Because communication is the key to keeping parents involved and aware of their child’s activities and growth while at the center we will provide the following:

  • A daily sheet tracking each toddler's activities, meals, diapering, and sleep.
  • The opportunity to develop relationships between the classroom and the families through our family events and activities. Frequent conversations between teachers and parents either in person or by phone.
  • Our center’s open door policy which allows parents to visit at any time and spend time in the classroom.

Toddler Curriculum

Toddlerhood is as challenging as it is exciting for toddlers and adults. As they become aware of “self” and are able to maneuver physically through their world, they develop independence. Toddlers are curious by nature and enthusiastic explorers. They are egocentric but are interested and enjoy interacting with their peers.

The toddler environment is constructed with the thought in mind that every experience is a potential learning experience. Learning and development for toddlers is their total experience in the learning environment, not just specific learning activities during specific times in the daily schedule. We organize the environment using learning or play centers.

Repetition of movement and activities is important for brain development for toddlers. Repetition strengthens the neural pathways that toddlers are developing. So although novelty is stimulating and should be reflected in their environment, they need practice with activities that are familiar to them. Toddlers enjoy using the skills that already have developed. They like re-exploring the familiar. They have a need to repeat the familiar to cement those skills.

Problem-solving experiences for toddlers involve manipulating, experimenting, figuring out how parts relate to the whole, discovering one –to –one correspondence, cause and effect and creativity. Toddlers enjoy putting things together and taking them apart, building and constructing. They enjoy sorting and matching, and love to carry things.

The development of language is particularly crucial during the toddler period. We provide many opportunities for toddlers to engage in dialogue with peers and adults. We acknowledge and encourage the child’s communication during all learning experiences. We actively use and teach Sign Language with the toddlers. Signing with the toddlers helps to build the children’s vocabulary both verbally and nonverbally and allows them to communicate their needs and express themselves.

We organize the environment using learning or play centers; giving toddlers options and choice in smaller group settings. We understand child development which impacts how we plan for learning experiences.

Toddlers perfect their motor skills rather than acquire them as they did as infants. Toddlers need to climb, run, throw, and jump.

Play allows toddlers a combination of exploring new objects, practicing new and familiar skills, opportunities to problem solve, meet new challenges and build language skills.